Archive for » September, 2012 «

Werewolf Wednesday…All Hallows Evil (Lord of the Harvest) trailer, Skittles + werewolves, Carrie Vaughn interview, werewolves and mental illness

From DreadCentral.com, a new trailer for All Hallows Evil (Lord of the Harvest).

Synopsis: The sleepy town of Hallowed Hill is known by many as the Halloween capitol of the world because of its history and its pagan origins. People from all around come to visit the town on the night of All Hallows Eve. Two hundred years ago, on Halloween, a great evil was unleashed on the town by a witch who dabbled in the black arts. After a long night of mayhem brought on by this terrible evil, a select group of townsfolk were able to stop the witch and dispatch the evil back into the darkness from whence it came. Now, 200 years later, a young girl finds an ancient pagan book archived deep in the old cellar of the local library, and with the help of her wicked foster mother, the two again release the evil Sam Hain from his hell-bound prison to once again wreak havoc on Halloween night. The question is, can the town join together to stop the evil, or will Hallowed Hill be completely devoured by the Lord of the Harvest.

That trailer looks incredibly, horribly cheesy. Terribly cheesy. Unbelievably cheesy. I really want to like this movie (a town banding together to save itself, a werewolf, full moon, monsters everywhere), but oh my god, the acting and the effects in that trailer, no. Maybe itw ill end up being so cheesy it is awesome. I hope.

Speaking of werewolves and cheesy things that are also delightful, this Skittles commercial is something else.

Weird! Hilarious! There are a ton of commercials in this set, and I’m having way too much fun watching them. Oh, Skittles.

91.5 KUNC has an interesting interview with Carrie Vaugh, author of the Kitty Norville series. In particular, I was interested in what she had to say about the appeal of werewolf stories.

Excerpt:

Ensuing Chapters: What is the fascination with the werewolf? Maybe a theory on what, culturally, the fascination is, and personally, why you chose a werewolf?

Carrie Vaughn: I can tell you what traditionally the werewolf is, and the werewolf is interesting because for about the last 130 years it’s been pretty much the same thing. It hasn’t changed. The vampire has changed a lot. It’s become this other creature representing sin and decay coming from outside the community, and now it’s a symbol of power and immortality and forbidden pleasures and all of these highly sexualized, highly powerful metaphors. So the vampire has changed a lot.

Werewolf stories just have never gotten their time in the light. There have always been werewolves, but culturally, they’ve kind of been stuck in this ‘beast within’ type story. I’ve been calling it the Jekyll and Hyde story. With a few exceptions, every werewolf story—that has focused on werewolves specifically—has been the Jekyll and Hyde: Somebody who’s been overwhelmed by their base instincts and the beast within bursts out and destroys everything and then it dies. The end.

There’s just not a whole lot you can do with that. If that’s the story you’re focusing on, it always has the same trajectory and the same end. You can tell really good stories with that. I think An American Werewolf in London is brilliant, but it’s the same. You get infected, you struggle with the beast within, which bursts free and does horrible things, and then you die. Ginger Snaps, which is another great, recent werewolf movie, the same kind of thing. Even though it kind of turns it on its head. I feel like culturally, people haven’t gotten past the idea that werewolves represent the struggle with base nature, and it’s always the struggle with the beast within. And the beast within always has to lose.

One of the reasons I decided to make the main character a werewolf was to try to get past that metaphor. We can have good stories about werewolves if we’d just get past the idea that werewolves are always doomed to fall victim to this beast within dichotomy. Let’s pretend that you can actually be a well-balanced, functional werewolf who is in control of the beast within and you can actually function in society. What happens then? That just opens it up. Werewolves can then become characters rather than these metaphors, which is what they end up seeming to be in most of the stories that you see them in.

While I think she’s said some interesting things here, I do think there are stories to be told using the monster within metaphor. In particular, I often tell stories where werewolves and mental illness are entwined, and I think those are important stories to tell. In my experience, dealing with a mental illness often feels like dealing with the monster within, and I want to see stories that explore having functional lives while at the same time having that monster within that never goes away. Because you can have a beast within and have a life where you function in society.

Werewolf Wednesday…Werewolf family from Sims 3 Supernatural, Silver Bullet celebration, sales art for Wolves, Newcastle Werewolf review

Tech Guru just described Supernatural as this: Two guys driving around in a muscle car doing stupid shit. I can’t stop laughing.

GamerSyndrome.com has screenshots of Sims 3 Supernatural, and one of them is of the most adorable werewolf family EVER! Even the little teddy bear appears to have become a werewolf. It’s definitely time to get a copy of it. WEREWOLF FAMILIES FOR THE WIN!

Fascination with Fear did a Friday Flashback about Silver Bullet to celebrate the blue moon. It has an awesome image of the one sheet that I’ve never seen before and want a copy of for my office, and discusses some of the most fun parts of a movie I love.

Dread Central.com is not impressed with the first sales art for Wolves. I really like it, though. It is simple, but has two of my favorite werewolf story visuals, thick fog and pine trees. (I don’t think I realized that Jason Momoa is one of the actors, and I’m thrilled. Wicked hot.)

Bigger synopsis than I remember seeing, too: Cayden Richards, 18, has it all: captain of the high school football team, straight-A student, gorgeous girlfriend. But when he wakes one dark night to find his parents brutally murdered, he is horrified to realize that he is turning into an animal… a wild, savage wolf. Panicked, Cayden runs, determined to find out what is happening to him. His quest leads him to the strange, isolated town of Lupine Ridge, where two clans of wolves are on the brink of war. The opposing clans are lead by Connor, the powerful, pure-blood alpha of a savage pack, and John Tollerman, an old farmer, committed to protecting the human citizens of Lupine Ridge. But when Cayden falls for Angelina, the beautiful, young mate promised to Connor, a battle to the death is inevitable. And as the past begins to reveal itself, Cayden’s place in the world becomes clearer, as does his power to put an end to the savage violence building up around and within him.

Bangstyle.com has a review of Newcastle Werewolf. (Which I still have been unable to find, get with it, Tech Guru and other sources!)

Excerpt: After two 12 oz attempts at it, I’ve come to the firm conclusion that Newcastle has actually found a recipe for one of the better season blends. While many breweries go for the pumpkin-spiced route of the fall season, Newcastle has gone the Red Ale route. Always a brewery that doesn’t go with the trend (especially for a major brewer), their Werewolf sets itself apart in its ability to taste just like Newcastle classic (brown ale) with an added kick that’s subtler than most. You’ll find that the aftertaste is barely there and that the beer’s taste, while not complex, is full-bodied and distinguishable from the majority of breweries that are far too liberal with pumpkin-themed beer.